5 Ways to Address Failure

Have you ever thought about having this tagline?  I am Looking Forward to Failure.

Probably not. Who would?  We often link the failure to achieve a goal as coming up short versus others we wish to compare ourselves to.  You get this converged potion of feelings including disappointment, resentment, envy and self-doubt.  Most people’s lives and careers are based on seeking pleasure or avoiding pain. Most will bend over backwards putting themselves into a situation where they avoid failure because the perceived pain far exceeds any potential probability of success.

This is where we will stand out and make a difference in our lives.  Every failure is a stepping stone to inevitable success. If you knew, in the bottom of your heart, that no short-term obstacle can prevent you from achieving your goals in life, wouldn’t you view failure in a different way?  You bet!!!

Scott Edinger, the founder of Edinger Consulting Group, co-authored an excellent HBR(Harvard Business Review) blog titled, Get Ready to Fail.  In it, Scott highlights 5 ways to address failure and make it part of the process rather than something to avoid.

1) Acknowledge the failure and put it in perspective
Research referenced in the blog shows that taking responsibility for your mistakes separates those who handle failure well from those who don’t.

2) Look for causes, not blame
Assigning blame means shifting control of a solution from yourself to others.  Focusing on the cause(s) means you take control to prevent similar failures in the future.

3) Before you wrack your brain to think up an appropriate response, take a break.
We are not designed to operate under a 24/7 mode though when we confront failure, we cannot stop thinking about it. Engage in other pursuits. Spend time with loved ones or get some physical activity(endorphins). Let your mind wander. You will be surprised what 30 minutes to a few days of a mental break can do.

4) Get some help.
Feeling down is normal. Prolonged periods of depression and despair are not. If needed, find that friend, mentor or therapist to help you through this setback.

5) Refocus your efforts and take action.  
Nothing will make you feel quite as good as taking action and finding even a small element of success in that action. It may take some time to reach that success, but you certainly won’t have any until you start trying.

Action of the Day
Identify if you are taking any risks in your career where you are risking failure. If not, identify an action you could take to make a difference. Make believe you failed miserably in your initial efforts.  Create an outcome that is likely to cause you to feel let down, rejected or taking several steps back instead of forward.  Now, pretending you have failed, go through the 5 steps above in your mind. Play the scenario out. Do you come out of the role playing exercise in a stronger place where the implications of a failure can bring you strength and one step closer to success? The pain of failure starts to be less significant than the pleasures of success from the experience.

Quote of the Day:  “Don’t wait. The time will never be just right”….. Napoleon Hill

Picture Credit: © Ia64 | Dreamstime.com

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Did you make a Career Mistake?

      Is your career where you want it to be?  If not, maybe you are reading this while slugging away at a boring 9-5 job or possibly combing over the various position openings de jour on Monster.com or Snagajob.com. The bottom line is that you are feeling dissatisfied. Did you make a career mistake somewhere that resulted in your current circumstance?

In an interesting article by Paul Schoemaker on Inc.com, titled “You Need to Make More Mistakes”, don’t even think twice on a making a regrettable mistake. In fact, you need to make significantly more of them to get to where you want to go. Is this great news?  Most definitely, YES.

 When going for my MBA, I was earning a very good income in the Finance Industry in sunny Los Angeles with good prospects of growth and career advancement. I had the yearning to get my MBA in my late 20s while most of my peers were starting their careers and earning growing incomes. I decided to go heavily into debt for an illusive MBA career; moving my new wife to a new city in Chicago.   My friends were earning income, buying homes, building wealth, while I was going into the hole on a monthly basis on living expenses. While the academic and “life” experience of the MBA degree was everything I could hope for, I started getting a gnawing pang in my gut.

Did I make a Career Mistake? 

NO…I took a risk, gained an incredible experience, and realized that no matter what happened, nobody can repossess the skills I learned. This was MY JOURNEY  to better myself and become more marketable.   It took me much longer than others to gain financial stability, own a house and build my career. However, if I didn’t risk making a “career mistake”,  I wouldn’t have the success and happiness I am enjoying today.

SO GO AHEAD, MAKE A MISTAKE…..

ACTION:

1) What were two of your biggest “Career Mistakes”?  Identify 3 things that ultimately benefitted you from making those mistakes. Every mistake is a stepping stone to learning.

2) What is your biggest career decision ahead of you right now that you are afraid of becoming a mistake? Are you unable to recover from a temporary setback? Is there any way you could move, if required, in a slower way to make it work?

Quote of the Day: “Always desire to learn something useful.” — Sophocles